Argentina Vacations

Argentina is a land of geographic extremes. Stretching through the center of the country and along the western border is the land of the Gauchos and La Pampa. The Pampa region is a region of flat grasslands that extends from the Atlantic coast to the Andean foothills. It is an area that originally suited the raising of cattle and horses, but today you will find numerous wineries in the area. Further south is the Patagonia and it's rolling terrain that rises from the west coast of Argentina to the Andes Mountains. Along the western border with Chile are the Andes Mountains. Culturally, Argentina has a definite European flair because of the large number of Italian and Spanish immigrants in the 19th and 20th centuries. The capital of Argentina is cosmopolitan Buenos Aires with a population of 3,000,000. The cities of Argentina follow many southern European standards: businesses and shops open early, then they close for a long break at midday, and then stay open into the evening. Social interaction occurs in the streets, local bars and nightclubs; and meals are a time for enjoying family and friends.

Argentina Vacation Rentals and Boutique Hotels

Argentina Vacations: Things to see while on vacation in Argentina

One of the most beautiful places in the world, the home to culinary greatness, and the gateway to Antarctica. This is just a few of the ways you can describe one of the greatest countries on Earth to visit, and that, of course, is Argentina. Argentina is truly a vacationer’s dream, and when you look at the activities you can do in this diverse place, you will quickly see why this is true. In this article, we are going to be looking at the geography of the country, the history of Argentina, a quick glimpse into the culture you can expect to be a part of, and finally will touch on some of the landmarks that you have to see while on your vacation to the gem of South America, Argentina.

Argentina Geography

Argentina is located at the southern tip of South America and is the mixing point for the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans which meet to its south. The capital, Buenos Aires is to the east of the country, and the vast majority of the population calls the northern half of the country home. The country itself can be divided up into five distinct regions. The Pampa is located in the central east region and is home to a temperate and humid climate that makes for a perfect agricultural area for the country. The Noresete enjoys a subtropical climate and has been made infamous due to its massive watershed, and the spectacular Iguazu Falls Rain Forrest area. The Noroeste is located in the North West of the country and is a desert-like climate with rolling hills and valleys. The Cuyo region is home to fertile foothills and thermal springs. This semi-arid climate is perfect for the growing of wine, and pit fruits, and is where the infamous Argentinian wine country is located. Finally, Patagonia is the southern half of the country and is home to mountains, glaciers, woodlands and everything from whales to penguins. Only 2.2 people per square kilometre call this place home, and it is truly where you go if you want to get away in nature in South America.

Argentina History and Culture

The history of Argentina is vast, but we will jump to the first contact with Europeans. The Spanish arrived in 1516, and go on to rule this new colony that was ripe with precious metals for almost 300 years. The British would attack the capital in Buenos Aires and the Falkland Islands in 1806, and although the local residents pushed the British forces out of the capital, the islands would remain a part of the British Empire. Then in 1810, after the Spanish defeat by Napoleon, the Argentinian people were given their ability to declare independence, which they did in 1816. The country would be in a good period of peace until in 1946 Juan Peron became president. He and his wife were hero’s among the working class and poor, but he was forced out of office in 1952 due to his attempt to increase his own power. The country fell into years of violent unrest and neared civil war. Finally, in 1976, the military took control of the country, and between 20 and 30 thousand revolutionaries were killed. In 1982, the Argentina government attempted to retake the Falkland Islands, which ended in a bloody defeat by British forces. This ended the military’s reign over the nation, and today, Argentina is home to a successful democracy that is working to increase its country’s reputation on the world stage.

Argentina is a place that is not like many in South America. The country itself does not have that many native populations, and the vast majority of residents directly came during the Spanish rule. Roughly 95% of the population in Argentina can trace their heritage back from three nations Italy, Spain and Germany. The capital is at the epicentre of the country, and mainly due to half of the population calls it and its surrounding suburbs home. Buenos Aires has been called the Paris of South America due to its roots in Europe found through food, wine and of course the architecture. Soccer is the preferred sport of the country, and local heroes start with Messi, the current centre-forward with FC Barcelona. You will be able to enjoy fresh seafood, and amazing beef while in Argentina. There are a number of Michelin Star chefs that call Argentina home throughout the year, and you will naturally have to indulge in some of the amazing wine that the region grows. Finally, if you are in the Pampas, you will be quick to notice the Gauchos. Present day cowboys, the Gauchos still ranch like their forefathers on the backs of their trusted steeds.

Argentina Landmarks

Tierra Del Fuego
Named for the early settlers who tended to their bonfires, Tierra Del Fuego is truly in a league of its own in terms of beauty and access to nature. You will be able to enjoy sailing, sightseeing, hiking throughout the forests and mountains and naturally some fly fishing. The area is infamous for its skiing and is home to the best seafood in the entire country.

Iguazu Falls
Located on the border of Argentina and Brazil, the Iguazu Falls are one of the natural wonders of the world. The area actually has over 275 falls, and it is roughly 2.7 kilometres long. The highest fall is 82 metres. The infamous Devil’s Throat is located in Argentina and is a u-shaped fall that is 82 metres high, 150 metres wide and almost 700 metres long. Almost 2/3 of the falls are within Argentina and is always worth the trek to.

Los Glaciers National Park
The second largest national park in Argentina, the park is home to the worlds largest ice cap and is home to Lake Argentino and Lake Viedma. Visitors will be able to enjoy hiking Cerro Fitz Roy and Cerro Torre as well as enjoy boat rides and sightseeing along the lakes. If you are looking to travel the park extensively, be warned that it can be a bit of a task. It takes roughly 4 hours on dirt roads, but you can also hire a local guide to help you along.


Take some time and visit the Península Valdés in Patagonia, where you can see many protected marine animal species: southern right whale, breeding populations of southern elephant seals and southern sea lions.

Tour the Ischigualasto / Talampaya Natural Parks which are 2 parks that cover over 275,300 HA of arid desert and where fossils from Triassic Period (245-208 million years ago) have been found.